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Category Archives: sexism

Via feministe: The arguement for paying moms less

The fact that mothers are under scrutiny for how much time they ‘waste’ while at work (taking phone calls from kids and having to pick them up on snow days etc) is itself sexist. Why don’t we ask how it is men can be productive, considering how constantly distracted they are by sex? Why don’t we ask how it is smokers can be productive? I repeat: the focus on women parents is sexist – and I’m not even tackling the inherent hypocrisy in pretending that we as a society care about families, while offering to pay those who do the family work less than others, thereby making it necessary for them to work even longer hours to make the money needed to cover the costs of working etc.

Only women are under this kind of scrutiny: how they dress, how much they weigh (overweight women make less money), how assertive they are or aren’t, how they choose lower paid jobs naturally (without consideration to why the jobs women choose pay less or what influences job choices), if they have children can they be as productive as those without children, if they don’t have children they are going to take maternity leave. Only women face these stereotypes; only women are always found wanting, found to be the makers of the sexism that prevents their success.

Yet, there are literally thousands of ways to ‘waste‘ time at work. Read More »

Then you can’t be a judge, apparently. 

Funny how these concerns never surface with fat male candidates. 

via Shakesville

Recently the mother of one of my daughter’s school friends commented about the protectiveness of this generation of parenting.

She said the mother of one of her older son’s friends called to tell her that she found her son searching for porn on the internet and called to let her know what the local 11-year-olds were getting into and was concerned that, if these boys were going to be viewing porn, that it be woman-positive.

This made the woman sharing the story with me laugh: now boys can’t even have their porn private she said, adding that Playboy just a part of childhood. I didn’t say anything to her, but I thought: what is on the internet isn’t Playboy, however harmless you do or do not think that magazine is.

Today’s boys are learning about sex from violent images that nobody would have seen as adults, never mind as a boy whose ideas of sexuality are just being shaped. Feminists can say this, but they aren’t taking seriously.

That’s why I love what this man has to say, via Feminist Law Professors. It’s the second video during which he gets talking about what younger boys are seeing and how this relates to the global sex trade and prostitution.

I’m hoping my girls hold out for the boys whose mothers talked to them about woman-positive porn…

I have grown weary of the horror-ridden tone taken whenever the spectacle that is teenage motherhood is discussed.

 Irresponsible sluts who only want to have children so they can be loved (Older people have children for entirely un-selfish reasons, you know so they can be, um, loved, so they can have someone who looks just like them, so junior can inherit the farm, the company, the family name, so someone will take care of them when they are old, because they are bored, because years of birth control failed one wine-filled evening – all much more mature reasons for having babies than those awful hormone-ridden teenager girls…)

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I’m invoking the P-word for this post. Patriarchy.

Because working in an office arranged around the father-knows-best and father-is-the-law ideology is as damaging for worker morale and for workplace productivity (the biz term for making sure lots of work gets done so the company can make lots of money and enough profit to keep you in a job).

And it is the kind of workplace in which I have landed.

I’m a creative, go-by-my-gut, everything-will-get-done-if-I-don’t-have-to-slow-down-for-bureaucratic-details, passionate, part-time contrarian. Which isn’t a good fit for this workplace.

Things I have recently been reprimanded for:

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I’m a business reporter. How I got here is another story for another blog; but here I am, reporting about business. It’s something I could make interesting if my editor would let me, but for some reason my editor feels that ‘interesting’ and ‘hard news story’ do not mix.

Anyway, the last two days, one of my fellow business reporters, a young man, in his early twenties, has appeared clean shaven and suited up. The reason? He’s attending two editorial board meetings (when big business people meet with a roomful of editors and reporters, get their picture taken saying important things and many stories are written about the appointment conversation, as if something actually took place).

The men he’s meeting with are wearing a suit and tie and so will he. Seems reasonable. Except I’m not certain that it is.

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