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Tag Archives: feminism

A few unrelated things I found interesting.

First: This is what we call a paradigm shift.

Because of the release of the new movie, this great love letter to Ginny Weasley.

A judge’s proposed celebration for the birth of a girl. Via feministe.

And a story about the wealth gap between the older and younger generations.


I’d like to write more about this, but I have a thesis proposal to put together. It’s about what is called the motherhood penalty, the fact that moms in the workplace are routinely paid less and offered worse, less reliable positions than women without children, men without children, and men with children.

I’ll just say that I first noticed the motherhood penalty when I was working full-time when my second daughter was born. No woman in my office who chose to have children escaped some sort of repercussion. One woman asked, after she had been shifted from regular day work to irregular day/evening shifts, if she could be given a set schedule two weeks ahead of time so she could plan childcare. Management said “we didn’t ask you to have kids”. She left. Her husband, who worked in the same office but was apparently free from the responsibility to arrange childcare, stayed.

Anyway, more analysis on the new research here. And more about the motherhood penalty here.

Via feminisiting. About a documentary about the life of Dr. George Tiller. I can’t watch that where I live, but there’s a clip from an old interview with Dr. Tiller that is amazing. And relevant in light of so many challenges today to abortion access.

The beating and assault of a woman in Calgary has the police repeating the same old messages: women should use caution when unescorted or unchaperoned. (via Lillith Attack)

It is so normal that women are considered fair game that when one is attacked the police use the moment to remind women that they need to restrict their freedom of movement. If they do not, they can forfeit their right to expect safety as a general rule.

Is the message garnered from a bank robbery and shooting that victims need to exercise caution and listen to their instincts when they enter a bank – as if by instinct a person can know a bank is going to be robbed or that a man is going to jump out from behind a bush and rape. Do we tell a man whose car was stolen that he should not have been driving it down the street alone in so flagrant a manner, or that parking in a public parking lot was asking for it? 

It’s a neat corner women are backed into: we are accused of playing the ‘victim card’ when we ask for political action on an issue concerning women. Then, when we go about the world as if we have a right to safety, we are told to act the victim, forever vigilant, using emotional and mental energy to predict when an attack might happen and where.

Nevermind that rape/sexual assault can happen anytime, anywhere, most frequently in our own homes, by people we know.

I have recently discovered that I am a woman.

Don’t get me wrong: physically I have always known I am a woman. But I have always considered myself different. Not a man, quite, but different: someone to be taken seriously.

Except that I am a woman. And that which is woman is not taken seriously, is it?

I have just discovered that the things I like are actually woman-things: conversation, connection and cooperation. Which makes me, not-man and in a field still dominated by men, an outsider.

Here’s how I discovered my gender.

Covering the second day of hearings on a subject that is not very dear to my heart: the operations and rate-change projections of energy utilities , I was the only female reporter in the room, a fact I didn’t notice until today – when another female reporter walked in.

A woman! I thought. It was novel. Read More »